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7 key questions – to make an impact 25 November, 2016

Posted by varoom in Selling.
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Whenever you want to communicate to someone, in business, time is short because in modern life most people’s attention spans are short. In my last Blog I talked about time to Ah Ha! Well that is only part, an important part, of the whole process. I believe there are 7 questions you should ask yourself when creating a communication to ensure you get beyond the Ah Ha stage.

  1. WHO – Do you want to speak to (Do know your audience)?
  2. WHAT – Will grab their attention (WOW factor)?
  3. WHAT – Do you want to say (Your most important Key Messages*)?
  4. TIME to Ah Ha! – Are you making it as simple as it can be?
  5. HOW – Often do you need to repeat the message to be effective?
  6. WHAT – Do you want them to do afterwards (Call to Action)?
  7. HOW – Will you deliver your message(s) (Which is the best channel)?

*Key messaging is one of my passions. A key message is what you want to be retained in the mind of the recipient after you have left or your communication is over. A key message is carefully worded, told within a story flow that is in the right sequence, easily communicated, easily understood and memorable.

The rewards of having a story flow are;

  • You bring the listener along with your story, if its easy to follow
  • The listener reacts positively to you, as it comes across as very well communicated.
  • They retain positive memory of you, we all like to remember people who are easy to understand
  • Improved chance of your recipient accepting your recommendations

Once you have a succinct script then concentrate on delivery. The best design communication is wasted unless it is delivered properly. A bit like a great joke told badly. It’s not funny.

So spend enough time to understand your audience and what will make them pay attention, craft your story then spend time perfecting the delivery.

This will increase your success rates with potential customers.

Grev

Shortest time to Ah Ha! 4 February, 2016

Posted by varoom in Selling.
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We as humans in today’s world tend to make our minds up about something very quickly, if we are not interested we switch off. If someone puts the responsibility on us to figure out what they mean most of us won’t do the work.

If someone gets what you do quickly, they are more likely to be interested, pay attention to what else you have to say and may even be persuaded by what you are offering. If you make it complicated, try to convey too much detail or assume prior knowledge the chances are you will fail.

Whenever we approach someone for the first time and we have a story to tell we need to gain their interest as soon as possible. The “Ah Ha” moment occurs when someone gets what you do and what you are offering. The soonest this happens the less likely they are to wander off.

So, when telling a story or making a pitch, design your script to just focus on the key points that are needed to understand what your proposition is. Craft the words so that they are easy to deliver, easy to understand and will be remembered after you have gone. Then you need to work on your delivery so that you can deliver your script in a way which maximises the chance of being understood.

So design your initial pitch so that it takes no time at all to understand what you do and what you are proposing. Having a scripted pitch will ensure you convey the same message each time, not forget any key points and make the most out of every opportunity. Then just keep testing and improving.

Following the Ah Ha! You can then expand further as you will have the interest and attention of your recipient.

Grev

Less is often more in the business world 22 March, 2012

Posted by varoom in Selling.
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Selling is a series of stages in your budding relationship with a customer. Each stage must be carefully controlled in order to facilitate a transition to the next phase. Gaining customers initial interest, building their trust, discovering their needs and arriving at a point where they are open to your proposition are stages in a sales relationship which are very similar to every day interpersonal relationships. Like in real life, push a relationship too fast and you are in danger of destroying it.

I often see entrepreneurs trying to squeeze every last piece of product information into earlier stages in their relationship with prospective customers. This is risky, in these situations it is important to realise that at every step of the sales process the priority is to get the prospect to the next stage. No-one buys, complex, non routine purchases, at the first step.

So when initially prospecting for new customers communicate only sharp focussed pieces of information that are guaranteed to pique their interest and get them to contact you. When you get a first contact, in the beginning only communicate information that will build trust and make the customer feel comfortable. Do not rush this stage! If you do the customer will not trust you and you will only discover needs that are of limited value. People do not tell others, they have no relationship with, important information of real value.

Once you have the trust of the customer and they have revealed their needs, then you put a proposal together which meets their needs exactly.

Because the customer was wowed by your succinct prospecting information, because you took the time to build a relationship of trust, the customer revealed real needs of significant value and hence the proposition you make will be more valuable to the customer.

Grev